Good Gus Books, Cory Returns, Children Story4-gushorse2-300x2401-150x150-largeWhen something goes wrong, both adults and children prefer to blame someone or something else. Its a bad habit. Children, when they are young, make up stories shifting the blame to a sibling, an imaginary person or monster, or anything that pops into their head so they won’t be scolded for their wrong doing. I have seen a number of You Tube videos that went viral with children denying they ate the donuts, cookies, etc. that were very cute. Children learn from us to blame others or circumstances. How many times has a teacher heard “the dog ate my homework?” When people are late for work or school many times they blame traffic, weather, their car, or public transportation was late. Sometimes many of their reasons are valid. However, there are always the people who do not leave in time to reach their destination without being late. In the old west, without advanced studies or knowledge of weather conditions, electronics or even the old fashioned phone, they could blame their horse, their neighbors, weather, etc. For example, in Book Three, “Cory Returns” Cory is walking his horse Midnight to a spring for a drink.  On the way a snake slithers out from under a rock and frightens Midnight so much that he rears back and took off.  In this instance, Cory blamed the snake and rightfully so.  The snake was an unexpected occurrence.  In my books I present situations and adventures with a variety of outcomes.  At no time was blame placed on anyone. Life and the circumstances surrounding it in the old west made everyone realize that if anything went wrong they were to blame or the circumstances surrounding an event such as weather or accidents were simply that and nothing more.  When you think about friendship, and people helping people regardless of the circumstances or if anyone is to blame, please take a glance at “Cory Returns.”